TV Review: MISFITS Series 4, Episode 8

PrintE-mail Written by Joel Harley

This time round, Rudy tracks down his mysterious love to the local nunnery (there is one, apparently), where he is given the elbow amidst a flurry of nun jokes and comparisons to penguins. “They should call it Sad Feet,” he quips...

It may seem like a case of puppy love, but Rudy's infatuation with this nun could have wider implications for both the gang and the world. You would think it was a little late in the day for a momentous, earth-shattering climax (some foreshadowing would have been nice), but the Horsemen of the Apocalypse are here. The resulting story might not be particularly gripping or even all that interesting, but the episode has some great lines (did we mention the nun jokes?) and a typically wonderful performance from Gilgun. Meanwhile, Alex – now re-attached to his member – proves to be a bit of a dick, as if we hadn't guessed from his antics last week. Then there's Finn and Abby getting it on (she really could do a lot better) and the community worker giving the Best Motivational Speech Ever to Rudy. The youths even use their powers a fair bit in this episode, too. That Finn certainly proves one to watch.

This may be a more fun and eventful episode than many of those we've seen this series, but it feels every bit as aimless. The villains don't even arrive properly until the last fifteen minutes. Disappointingly little has happened during this fourth series of Misfits. We've lost Curtis, Kelly and Seth; gained Finn, Jess and Abby – but what has anyone actually done? It's all seemed remarkably disposable so far. There's a sacrifice at the end of the episode which feels completely meaningless, because we know almost nothing about the sacrificial lamb in question.

“Do you think we suffer from a lack of ambition and imagination?” one of the gang asks, during this final episode of Series Four. Well yeah, a little. Here's hoping that Misfits can get itself back on track for the inevitable fifth series.



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