KILLS ON WHEELS

PrintE-mail Written by Jonathan Edwards

Written and directed by Attila Till, KIlls on Wheels is a refreshing piece of cinema that sees two disabled teenagers getting involved in a life of crime. Driven by despair and frustration they soon find meaning after becoming friends with ex-fireman turned hitman, Rupaszov (Szabolcs Thuróczy). Tough and at times frequently callous, Rupaszov has also found himself wheelchair bound due to a tragic accident from his previous profession. Finding it hard to deal with his new life, he’s able to find strength and humility by befriending the two teenagers and in turn they also become stronger due to his carefree nature.

Inspired by their personal experiences, we see the two teenagers creating a comic book concurrently with their time spent with Rupaszov and although the lines of reality and fiction start to blur, it never impedes on the overall narrative. With the driving force of the film mainly focusing on the issues of disability and abandonment, Kills on Wheels is a heartfelt piece of work that can at times be both heartwarming and touching. Having been selected as the Hungarian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 2016 Academy Awards it unfortunately missed out on being nominated.

It’s a shame how a film of this nature has largely gone under the radar. With such a diverse cast of actors and a topic that is rarely handled in mainstream cinema, it’s humbling to see a film that never preaches or patronises its audience. Instead we’re given a raw, understated portrayal of disability and the way society views people who are differently abled. The two leads, Zoltán Fenyvesi and Ádám Fekete, who both suffer from the same conditions as their counterparts, put in a solid performance as two friends who are constantly trying to cope with their disability. With both actors having limited experience in front of the screen, it’s truly breathtaking to see how natural they are in their respective roles. Szabolcs Thuróczy is also fantastic as the self-destructive hitman who yearns for the love of his ex-wife, adding much humour and pathos to his character.

With a strong script, competent directing and gritty cinematography, Kills on Wheels is a well-balanced comedy, action-drama that will put you through a roller coaster of emotions. With Attila Till having spent some time working with the differently abled, it’s clear to see how invested he is in changing people's perceptions on disability and not only does he handle it with care but he’s also able to put an interesting spin to the genre as a whole. A progressive bit of filmmaking that has plenty to offer, Kills on Wheels is an original piece of work that deserves to be seen by all.

KILLS ON WHEELS / CERT: 15 / DIRECTOR & SCREENPLAY: ATTILA TILL / STARRING: SZABOLCS THUROCZY, ZOLTAN FENYVESI, ADAM FEKETE / RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW



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