THE REZORT [EDINBURGH FILM FESTIVAL]

PrintE-mail Written by Andrew Marshall

In the aftermath of the war against the zombies, humanity is slowly putting itself back together. The only undead still upright and shuffling are held in an island safari park where the wealthy can pay to go on a shooting spree. Inevitably, it all goes to hell and a mismatched group of survivors must fight their way to safety.

It seems that even in the aftermath of the potential annihilation of the human race, some people can still conjure up ways to make money off it. Despite the vast wealth required for anyone to be at the Rezort in the first place, various reasons are concocted for other social demographics to form part of the featured characters. You’ll be able to fairly accurately guess the order they’ll die, the only question being when and how, and even that won’t be too difficult for anyone who’s seen enough films like these. Each is there to serve a specific purpose, be it a revelation to expand the thin plot or another character reacting to them to develop their limited characterisation. Despite these efforts they are all largely uninteresting, with only Dougray Scott’s taciturn sniper being of any real interest, and he is unfortunately given the least amount of development, remaining a taciturn enigma throughout.

The Rezort has been described as “Jurassic Park meets The Walking Dead,” but is comparable to the latter only in regards to zombies and the former from the plot’s major story beats, which rather than elevating the film to the lofty heights of Spielberg’s modern classic it merely highlights the lack of narrative originality. In all honesty, if you want to compare it to something, it actually feels far more like a dramatized playthrough of Resident Evil 2, minus the encroaching sense of dread. Also, when a glaring plot hole in the initial setup is addressed late in the film after it becomes significant to the story, it’s treated like some eureka revelation that we’re supposed to have not questioned up until that point simply because nobody explicitly pointed it out, rather than an inconsistency in the plotting you chose to overlook because you just assumed it was a mistake.

Despite attempts to do something a little different with the genre, such as using a camp of refugees from the zombie war to make a none-to-subtle point about current right-wing immigration policies, The Rezort contains nothing distinctive beyond its initial premise, and ultimately offers little more than the countless scores of others to mine a similar vein.

THE REZORT / CERT: TBC / DIRECTOR: STEVE BARKER / SCREENPLAY: PAUL GERSTENBERGER / STARRING: JESSICA DE GOUW, DOUGRAY SCOTT, MARTIN MCCANN, JASSA AHLUWALIA, ELEN RHYS, CLAIRE GOOSE / RELEASE DATE: TBC

Expected Rating: 6 out of 10

Actual Rating:
 


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