LET GO

PrintE-mail Written by Andrew Marshall

Let Go begins with a scene of perfect tranquillity. Young mother Anna plays with her two children Mathis and Claire, the three of them blissfully happy in nothing but each other’s company. But the idyll is soon shattered when we realise something happened to Claire, that the girl’s young life has been cruelly cut short. Mathis, however, acts as though everything is fine since as far as he is concerned Claire is still with them and nothing tragic has occurred.

From Let Go’s blissful starting point, the tone of each successive scene becomes gradually bleaker as it approaches a nadir of utter despair. Anna’s struggle to cope with Claire’s death is made all the more difficult by Mathis’ steadfast refusal to believe she is gone, his every statement about what she is saying to him driving Anna closer to the edge of her sanity. The film forces you to ponder the multiple possibilities of the situation, while the ambiguous presentation keeps you unsure which perception is to be taken as the truth, ultimately providing no simple answer and instead letting you decide for yourself what occurred.

To any parent nothing is more terrifying than the loss of a child. The very idea of trying to carry on one day to the next is an emotional black hole slowly devouring any sense of joy from life, while the real world becomes a place you can no longer properly perceive, as though your grief casts it in an impenetrable haze that distances you from its presence. For such a tragedy to be a film’s driving force requires a degree of tact and sensitivity that it can prove difficult to balance.

The fact that Let Go conveys such a depth of emotion in a limited space of time (the short is less than 15 minutes long) is a testament to Dréan’s skill as a filmmaker and marks her as a skilled chronicler of human emotion. The efficiency with which she reveals the extent of Anna’s heartache is harrowing to watch but at the same time impossible to turn away from.

LET GO / CERT: TBC / DIRECTOR & SCREENPLAY: ISABEL DREAN / STARRING: CLAUDIA FERRI, JAZ COTE DREAN, MILAN COTE DREAN / RELEASE DATE: TBC
 


Suggested Articles:
The spiritual world and the afterlife continue to provide food for thought and fascination to any nu
For filmmakers, a beleaguered central character crippled by grief following the death of a loved one
Science fiction is all about the ideas. It’s about the “what-ifs?” and the “might-bes”; ab
When it comes to creating insane, overblown, overambitious sci-fi, writer/director Luc Besson really
scroll back to top

Add comment

Security code
Refresh

Other articles in Movie Reviews

A GHOST STORY 14 August 2017

THE DOMICILE 13 August 2017

ALIEN: REIGN OF MAN 06 August 2017

VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 05 August 2017

THE EMOJI MOVIE 05 August 2017

ANNABELLE: CREATION 04 August 2017

THE GHOUL 01 August 2017

CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS: THE FIRST EPIC MOVIE 28 July 2017

HOUNDS OF LOVE 26 July 2017

DUNKIRK 23 July 2017

- Entire Category -

Sign up today!
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner