ACROSS THE RIVER

PrintE-mail Written by Dominic Cuthbert

Across the River Review

REVIEW: ACROSS THE RIVER / CERT: 15 / DIRECTOR: LORENZO BIANCHINI / SCREENPLAY: LORENZO BIANCHINI, MICHELA BIANCHINI / STARRING: RENZO GARIUP, MARCO MARCHESE / RELEASE DATE: JULY 14TH

Across the River, from Italian filmmaker Lorenzo Bianchini, is a traditional ghost story in the fullest sense. Like The Woman in Black, it functions mostly on suggestion and whispers of the paranormal to spine-tingling effect. Unlike its American counterparts, Across the River is rooted in European horror, with nods to Dario Argento and Bergman.

The plot, what little there is, follows Marco Contrada (Marchese), an ethologist performing a periodic wildlife census, living out of his RV and fitting cameras to trees and animals. His dictaphone is the predominant source of dialogue.

The film, like the classic point-and-click adventure Myst, draws its scares from the unknown, from the environment and from the pressing sense of isolation while Marco pieces the mystery together from fragments. Indeed, it’s a film you could imagine translating well to a first person mystery in the style of Gone Home.

The punky monochrome film from the animal-mounted camera reminds you just what made The Blair Witch Project so unnerving. It functions especially well against the long shots which so evocatively capture the ethereal woodland setting of the Italian/Slovenian border. However, all this flitting between handheld and static cameras does get disorientating towards the end, and detracts from the beautiful and creepy shots of the trees and village.

Across the River is an unsettling film, with a simple yet melancholic score that is a reminder of what made horror so effective in the first place. It’s a good old-fashioned ghost story that’s a refreshing change from big budget, over-the-top American horror.

Extras: Across the River - Short Documentary / Introducing 'A Night with Friends' by Daniele Trani / A Night With Friends / Trailer

 



Suggested Articles:
Long before Robert Downey Jr. or Benedict Cumberbatch ever portrayed Sherlock Holmes on our screens
Polish writer/director Walerian Borowczyk was quite the card. In a 40-year career (he died in 2006),
Getting a new release from the BFI following their recent Scorsese celebration, Alice Doesn’t Live
Make no mistake, this isn’t competing with the likes of The Abyss or Das Boot, either for expansiv
scroll back to top

Add comment

Security code
Refresh

Other articles in DVD / Blu-ray Reviews

SHERLOCK HOLMES: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION 22 March 2017

THE STORY OF SIN 20 March 2017

ALICE DOESN’T LIVE HERE ANYMORE 20 March 2017

THE CHAMBER 20 March 2017

THE WARTIME CHRONICLES 20 March 2017

PIECES 18 March 2017

SOLARIS 18 March 2017

WHO'S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR 18 March 2017

THE DOCTORS: THE JON PERTWEE YEARS 17 March 2017

FRIGHT NIGHT 14 March 2017

- Entire Category -

Sign up today!
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner