JUPITER’S CIRCLE VOLUME 1

PrintE-mail Written by Ed Fortune

For a genre that constantly references and recreates itself, comic book superhero books do seem to be continually stuck in the past. Mark Millar’s Jupiter’s Circle is the tale of Golden Age-style superheroes flying around punching alien menaces in 1950s’ America. It also dives into gritty ‘real world’ drama by exploring the personal lives of the heroes. For example, the first story is about a hero who happens to be gay during the McCarthy era.

Jupiter’s Circle is meant to be a prequel to Millar’s more popular (and better known) post-modern superhero book, Jupiter’s Legacy. Both books are essential superhero soap operas; yes, there’s two-fisted villain punching, but mostly it’s about the personal lives of the heroes. It’s easy to dismiss Jupiter’s Circle; after all, Kurt Busiek has covered all this ground in Astro City.
However, when the Circle is paired with Legacy we start to get a clearer picture of the many, many cracks in the character’s psyche. The sins of the parents passed down to a younger and more powerful generation is an obvious theme of the book. These are strong themes, but Legacy does it all better and in a more memorable way.

Wilfredo Torres is the artist on the project and he captures the simple lines and powerful images of classic four-colour heroes beautifully. Each page feels like it’s come from an older, less complex time, making it very easy for the reader to immerse themselves in the story. The art is good, but it’s not Frank Quitely, who does some of the cover art of the book. This serves as a bit of a reminder that Jupiter’s Legacy is a prettier book.
 
It’s hard to shake the feeling that Jupiter’s Circle is nothing more than a lighter, more marketable version of some of the best bits from The Watchmen. The various scandals and adventures in the book are all well and good but this is nothing remarkable. We don’t have enough time to care about the characters, and only those who have read Jupiter’s Legacy will have any investment at all. 

Jupiter’s Circle is a great pitch for a movie, but not such a great comic book. One for the Mark Millar fans only.
 
JUPITER’S CIRCLE VOLUME 1 / WRITER: MARK MILLAR / ARTIST: WILFREDO TORRES / PUBLISHER: IMAGE COMICS / RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW

 

Suggested Articles:
When New York photographer Rebecca accepts an assignment in the dark twisted wilds of England’s So
On the face of it, Herman is an introverted street cleaner who picks up garbage on the city’s wate
The US presidential elections always throw up candidates who say they will blow the lid off the UFO
As you may well guess, Spies takes us into the dark and violent world of secret agents. Three brief
scroll back to top

Add comment

Security code
Refresh

Other articles in Comic Book Reviews

THE EYRIE 14 June 2017

HERMAN BY TRADE 29 May 2017

SAUCER STATE 25 May 2017

SPIES #1 19 May 2017

EL GIGANTE - THE COMIC 04 May 2017

KISS: THE ELDER VOL 1 – A WORLD WITHOUT SUN 23 April 2017

SLAUGHTERHOUSE FARM IV 19 April 2017

JUDGE DREDD: CAPE AND COWL CRIMES 11 April 2017

INVINCIBLE 10 April 2017

ANGEL CATBIRD VOLUME 1 07 April 2017

- Entire Category -

Sign up today!
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner