ROCHE LIMIT VOL 1: ANOMALOUS

PrintE-mail Written by Dominic Cuthbert

COMIC BOOK REVIEW: ROCHE LIMIT VOL 1: ANOMALOUS / ARTIST: MICHAEL MORECI / ARTIST: VIC MALHOTRA / PUBLISHER: IMAGE COMICS / RELEASE DATE: APRIL 7TH

There’s some artist/writer combinations in comic books that seemed to have been written in the stars themselves, be it Jack Kirby and Stan Lee or Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky. Roche Limit sees the perfect pairing of writer Michael Moreci and artist Vic Malhotra, and Volume 1: Anomalous marks the first in their masterful sci-fi noir series.

The narration is devastating, which charts the last recordings of Langford Skaargard, self-styled adventurer, eccentric and billionaire. After delivering on his promise to take humankind to the stars, his dream becomes a cruel reality. Roche Limit, a grubby colony floating on the edge of an enigmatic anomaly, is a cyberpunk microcosm of organised crime, drug trade and terrible secrets. Alex Ford, chemist-cum-drugs manufacturer, is the only one who knows how to produce the existential high-inducing recall, which enables users to relive moments in their life of pure joy and happiness. After Bekkah Hudson goes missing, Alex, her boyfriend, and sister Sonya go up against troubled figures of the colony’s deepest underground and onto a discovery of what our future’s worth.

Moreci’s writing reads like Douglas Adams and Ray Bradbury with all the self-assured intellect of Isaac Asimov and Phillip K. Dick. With the sharp dialogue recalling pulpy noir exchanges while avoiding genre pitfalls altogether. He carefully balances plots, beautifully woven together for a satisfying and resonating conclusion. Philosophical, theological and full of barbed diatribes and biting social commentary, Moreci’s writing has the perfect accompaniment in Malhotra’s art; sketchy, dark, foreboding and with a Frank Miller edge. There are some truly outstanding panels, where he demonstrates his space-scapes are second to none. Together they’ve created a fully realised world that is at once familiar and esoteric. At the end of each issue is supplementary material which ties directly into the narrative, be it a newspaper article or a magazine piece, each add a sense of effective realism.

Despite its grim look at the future, Roche Limit is no less beautiful, no less full of wonder and marvel. It’s a powerful metaphor for drug abuse, for sin and redemption and, of course, god. For a fix of cerebral, introspective sci-fi, it’s not cinema that’ll nourish you, it’s Moreci and Malhotra.
 

SHARE YOUR COMMENTS BELOW OR ON TWITTER @STARBURST_MAG

Find your local STARBURST stockist HERE, or buy direct from us HERE. For our digital edition (available to read on your iOS, Android, Amazon, Windows 8, Samsung and/or Huawei device - all for just £1.99), visit MAGZTER DIGITAL NEWSSTAND.

CLICK TO BUY!

MORE FROM AROUND THE WEB:



Suggested Articles:
The port town of Stonehaven in northeast Scotland has come under the scourge of bloodsucking undead.
Everyone knows Sherlock’s story, but what about his older – and apparently smarter -brother Mycr
Is the voice the seat of the soul? Sound engineer Hermann Karnau thinks so, and he’s obsessed with
Leah Moore and John Reppion’s graphic adaptations of stories by M.R. James continue in this second
scroll back to top

Add comment

Security code
Refresh

Other articles in Comic Book Reviews

VAMPIRES EVERYWHERE 14 October 2017

MYCROFT HOLMES AND THE APOCALYPSE HANDBOOK 03 October 2017

VOICES IN THE DARK 03 October 2017

ALIEN TOILET MONSTERS #1 03 October 2017

GHOST STORIES OF AN ANTIQUARY 2 02 October 2017

MOMENTS OF ADVENTURE – COLLECTION TWO 29 September 2017

THE LIZARD 29 September 2017

ATARI SWORDQUEST 29 September 2017

THE SHOWDOWN VOL. 2: THE RACE FROM HELL 28 September 2017

P M BUCHAN'S HANGOVER 28 September 2017

- Entire Category -

Sign up today!
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner