Book Review: GRIMM - AUNT MARIE'S BOOK OF LORE

PrintE-mail Written by Alister Davison

Review: Grimm – Aunt Marie's Book of Lore / Author: Various / Publisher: Titan / Release Date: Out Now

It’s a safe bet to say anyone who’s watched the Grimm TV series will be familiar with Aunt Marie’s Book of Lore, Nick Burkhardt’s go-to bestiary and all-round monster manual. It’s a tome that’s been written through the ages, in various languages, its yellowed papers bound in leather, handed down through generations of Grimms.

This version, published by Titan Books, is a glossy facsimile of what viewers have seen in the series, complete with its sketchy drawings, translations and notes in the margin. There are even bloodstains and photographs of props, made to look like they’ve been placed upon these open pages. It ties in seamlessly with the TV show, adding in some of Detective Burkhardt’s notes and police files (which, being recent additions, are in white paper and look like they’ve been taped in).

Much care has obviously been taken in the design of this book, and it’s the attention to detail that makes it stand out from standard tie-in fare. It’s beautifully presented and, despite the pages being glossy, the colour of them gives a genuine illusion of age; there are even ‘rips’ and ‘claw-marks’ that show the next page through them, just as if the book itself were torn.

Fans of Grimm will no doubt enjoy flicking through these pages, finding them in keeping with the tone of the series (there’s a weapons section that is darkly humorous), although newcomers should be warned that many of the creatures are covered in a detail that could spoil any would-be surprises. Other than that, this book is a great accompaniment, one that’s been created with care and affection.


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