DEAD FUNNY: ENCORE

PrintE-mail Written by Scott Varnham

You know an anthology is bloody good when Alan Moore’s contribution is not even the best one in it. As the title suggests, Encore is the second in the Dead Funny series. We missed the first one when it came out but you can be assured we’re adding it to our Amazon basket as we speak (other retailers are also available).

If you also missed it, Dead Funny is an anthology of horror stories written by critically-acclaimed comedians. Robin Ince and Johnny Mains have put together a book featuring the best comedy talent. One of the joys of an anthology like this is seeing the different influences at work. You can see what each person finds terrifying. For example, while one or two authors deal with nameless horrors being summoned, another focuses on the entirely adult fear of a missing child, or yet another focuses on the man in the closet.

Josie Long’s story, A Ghost Story, is our personal favourite. The main idea feels like one that should have been done a thousand times before (composers living on as ghosts each time their music is played), but Long brings her voice and wit to it, making it her own. Nobody else could have written this haunting story. James Acaster and Rufus Hound have also contributed staggeringly good stories. Most of the tales are both funny and horrifying, but those that fall short of being comedy stories are still terrifying, though. Hell, most of the authors in here could make a decent living as horror writers if they were willing to put the comedy game to one side.

It’s the kind of book you’ll wish you discovered years ago. Any writer worth their salt will want to become a comedian in order to have a crack at a potential third volume, and any reader worth theirs needs to pick this book up.

DEAD FUNNY - ENCORE / EDITOR: ROBIN INCE, JOHNNY MAINS / PUBLISHER: SALT PUBLISHING / RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW

 


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