WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S THE CLONE ARMY ATTACKETH

PrintE-mail Written by Leona Turford

In a clash-strewn galaxy far, far away, yeoman Jedi Anakin Skywalker is torn between duty to the Jedi, his love Padme, and concern for his beloved mother. It’s a story that brings together both the quill of Shakespeare and the galaxy of George Lucas, with a parody novel that will certainly surprise you.

With a cast of characters that we're all too familiar with, The Clone Army Attacketh is the latest instalment in author Ian Doescher's take on the Star Wars universe, bringing a refreshingly different direction, as we follow Anakin on his fateful path and that of the entire Republic.

A tale of noble ladies in danger, and great battles between knights and squires that could have easily been penned by Shakespeare himself, that is if he were more inclined towards galactic battles, but the style that we're familiar with from Shakespeare's work, of insightful soliloquies and tales of wit, are interwoven perfectly with the familiar storylines from Episode II: Attack of the Clones.

With great twists and turns throughout, letting us see some of our favourite (and not so well-loved) characters play out a different story amongst the familiar storylines, from a witty R2-D2, to a far more enjoyable Jar Jar Binks, as each character tells their story amongst the battles.

The story is brought together perfectly with some period illustrations throughout, making for a novel that could have been plucked out of the Bard's best.

The Clone Army Attacketh certainly goes where other parody novels have often failed to tread, you won't find a silly spin-off here, but a surprisingly well thought out read that brings together the best of Shakespeare with Attack of the Clones for a Star Wars parody that's simply an entertaining read. Whether you're familiar with Shakespeare's works or not, you'll find it a joy to read, with plenty of surprises along the way.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S THE CLONE ARMY ATTACKETH / AUTHOR: IAN DOESCHER / PUBLISHER: QUIRK BOOKS / RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW


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